Beetroots, Bleeding and PMT

Beetroots, lets face it are pretty amazing vegetables.  Anything edible that boldly bleeds crimson colour has the right to claim powerful nutritional benefits.  But this is not a nutritional blog about beetroot.  It may be a long windy one, but worth it, that is my hope.  We are discussing menstruation, conscious cycling and transit times mostly in response to a social media post over a grumpy lunch of beetroot kimchi on International Women’s Day 2021.

I have consciously tracked my menstrual cycle for many years. Not only am I aware but I make sure that it is on the calendar for everyone else in the household to be aware of too. An average month goes in the regular flow from ovulate to luteal phase, bleed to follicular phase on a regular 28 day cycle with relatively few fluctuations, for which I am grateful.

That all sounds rather technical and factual and not at all how I truly read, honour and embrace it.  Our cycle is a source of wisdom and I like to understand it as seasons.  When I consider my cycle this way, I am no longer indifferent, I am aware. In Summer, I ovulate and on into Autumn. Followed by winter, when I bleed and on into Spring, where I find myself now.

This is a powerfully useful reframe, as you start to notice and integrate this, your month reshapes and you may just realise that we are not linear beings who operate at the same speed and productivity all the time.

In the Spring of my cycle I find myself naturally spending a lot of time mapping and scheming how to make things happen in my life. Already you can appreciate how this mimics nature and all the renewed spring vibes but also it is a real embodied feeling that this phase is a very different energy to the previous week of my bleed, my winter.

Winter, when in flow, is a time to rest and recover. Your life may not be in the rhythm yet but I feel no guilt or shame to do the bare minimum.  I embrace the rest and don’t force anything as i know by the time summer comes I will catch up.  I left the writing of this blog until Spring. I knew I could bring some energy to it that was lacking whilst I rested in winter.  

So what has this to do with PMT.

Being cycle conscious immediately highlights a direct relationship to my mood. We change throughout the month. This month in particular it has allowed me to clearly see the whole picture as a series of events that lead to a rather harsh Autumn. Yes cactus head is beyond apt, in thought and word I couldn’t have been more prickly. Very unlike me.

A few weeks earlier, I had concluded a long and considered dental plan which will form a blog another time, but it is suffice to say that I found myself seeking out pain relief for longer than i cared to.  I have birthed two children without pain relief, but there is just something about tooth ache that needs urgent numbing. The resulting issue I want to address is, using pain relief has repercussions on your digestive system. Did you join that dot?

To get to the details, did you know that three daily movements is the golden seal of well being?  Think about it, if you eat three meals a day then emptying of the bowels three times would seem logical.  Less than one elimination a day and we have to pay attention to the backup.  If constipation is something that troubles you then please give it some attention, for many reasons, not only the sheer discomfort of it.

Look at your hydration and fibre intake and make sure they are sufficient and maybe even consider a little gentle colon cleanse with flax seeds.  Many chronic diseases begin in a gut, it is not hard to imagine when unnecessarily carrying around kilos of waste matter that needs eliminated.  With this particular blog focus on our cycle, a backlog of waste matter is bad news for of your hormones.  Instead of moving on and out they just get recycled.

Whilst our hormones can do the merry dance throughout our monthly cycle, from shades of happy to a mysterious sadness, keeping a healthy gut will have enormous benefits on this pendulum. Menstrual cramps, bloated wombs, exhaustion, irritability, mood swings are all indicators that our hormonal messengers are not happy, and either are we. (Just FYI holding dill / carrots tops in front of your privates will have no effect your hormones.)

Hormones imbalances are a complex matter but let’s start with the obvious. Just how regular are you?

And what does this have to do with beetroot again?

Beetroots powerful purple-crimson pigment is a wonderful indicator of our transit time. Beeturia, the excretion of red beetroot pigment (betalaine) in urine and a stool, it’s so fascinating it even has a technical name.

Your transit time is a key factor in a healthy digestive system. There is no normal time per say as it is largely dependant on the food eaten, for example if it is fruit or a complex carb, a protein or a simple sugar all with different digestion times.  We can however suggest average transit time through the colon in someone who is not constipated is 30 to 40 hours.  One thing that is obvious though, eat beetroot and you are going to see how long it takes. Ideally the next day, if you care to look you should see the evidence. Does this help explain my grumpy beetroot kimchi lunch choice on International Women’s Day?

This is something to ponder, something to play with, something to try as you cycle through the month.  Perhaps beginning with whipping up some fermented beetroot kimchi too?

If you would like to know more about this way of being in your flow then start to sync your menstrual calendar to the seasonal rhythms.  It is easiest when you start to menstruate. Just mark it with a big red pen: WINTER

Spring will bring its much welcomed reawakening and much like summer, when I ovulate, everything feels sunny, bright, and playful.  I feel the most confident around this time and a lot more receptive to new ideas and challenges.  It is when I usually schedule social engagements, important conversations, bigger projects and social, fun time with friends.

Sensing how this goes, Autumn follows on and gives way to the whisper of a gentle nesting. I instinctively find myself cleaning up and decluttering, both physical and emotional stuff.  Left unattended you can understand why those tears of overwhelm fall the day before our bleed. When we tune in with this inner knowing, this little tool is an inner guidance system. To think of all those years of not knowing, being thrown around in the surf.  I feel for my younger self. On the odd occasion that I stop paying attention, you know, when life throws some things your way at times, I drift way, way off course.

There are two habits in my ongoing well being if I miss, I notice .  The first, of course, being including fermented probiotic foods into my diet on a regular basis. This keeps my digestive tube diverse, functioning and not back logged.  It is a slick food in and food out, as smooth as possible, operation here and when I slack, which I sometimes do (i am human afterall) I really notice the lag.

Secondly I support any potential hormonal ups and downs with a practice called seed cycling.  It is fairly easily to understand, easy to prepare and moderate to hard to remember to implement.  To admit, sometimes remembering to drink enough water in a day can be hard, I know it is the most basic and simplest of tasks, so there is your gauge. However once it is a habit, you are wining. Small daily habits that become routine are more effective than huge sparse efforts.

Seed cycling involves supporting the phases of your cycle with a mix of seeds namely sesame, sunflower, pumpkin and flax. In my winter/ spring phase I add ground pumpkin and flax to my meals and in my summer / autumn I add sesame and sunflower

This weeks plan goes forth like so.

  • Grind one week’s worth of pumpkin and flax seeds.

  • Store sealed in the fridge to maintain freshness.

  • Consume two tablespoons of seeds each day. I put mine on top of salads, or whatever I am eating. I sometimes even make a pesto with the particular seed combo.

  • Switch seeds to sesame and sunflower the day of ovulation.

  • Repeat for week two of the luteal phase.
  • Switch seeds back to pumpkin and flax the first day of menstruation and on it goes.

Of course you can make this as delicious as you wish. Serve it up as a Rayu OR as seed bread. Make healthy halva or chocolate bark. Don’t make it a bore, variety is the spice.

WOMEN ARE CYCLICAL BEINGS, LIVING IN A LINEAR WORLD. HAVE SOME FUN.

FROM THE TOMB TO THE WOMB

There are some things that once considered from a different perspective are irrevocable. This year rolled into existence unlike any other, without the new year, new resolutions bind.  From the year of unknowns to a year filled with many more, instinctively it felt so right to remain quiet.  No new year resolutions to make and break for me, no planning, visioning as of yet, firing up the engine to power into another year on this less travelled path. I am remain in the pause, the place between, still in the roots of winter, listening and learning from the quiet..  There has been much to learn, much to let go of and much to become at peace with before the gentle sprouting of seeds deep in my soul want to grow with all the possibilities.

I have been so blissfully buried amongst pages and pages of inspiring books and this one has flipped the mind.

Environmental arts therapy and the Tree of Life by Ian Siddons Heginworth.  In its own words it guides us through the Celtic calendar to explore the relationship between the feeling experience of the human heart and the turning year. Practical, poetic, innovative and magical, it eaches us how to take the personal issues that bind and oppress us out into Nature where they can be met, confronted and transformed.  It is the perfect remedy for this place of Pause, January. The place between the tomb of December and the womb of February.

This book is for anyone who loves Nature.  This book is for anyone who longs for meaningful ritual and seeks to make it a living part of their lives. This book is for anyone who loves the magical language of metaphor and is beginning to understand its boundless power to manifest change, and this book is for anyone who loves fairy tales, myths and stories and wonders at their possible meanings.

This book has refined the beginning of the year for me.  Instead of getting caught up in the drama and disappointment of a New Year, unrealistic resolutions pitched at the wrong time,  I am convinced of the importance to stay inward, to deeply listen and to wait in the stillness for our own seeds of intention to waken with the light of spring. 

Nature is the wisest of teachers and once we have opened our hearts to her and learned her language she never ceases to guide us.

Ian Siddons Heginworth

As we near the end of the our winter Dreamtime we prepare for the Celtic Celebration of Imbolc.  Deeply rested we can bring forward our intentions to give possibility to.  

SPRING is the season of bitter flavours and awakening of the detox ogans of the body. Bitter flavors get our digestive juices flowing. 

Making your own digestive bitters is a wonderful spring activity. This is your personal tincture of bitter herbs, spices, roots and peels which you will then infuse in apple cider vinegar.  If you have been already speaking the language of Nature, then your apple cider vinegar will be ready after a nice long winter ferment and your dandelion roots are still available to harvest. Dandelion roots can be harvested from late autumn through to early spring, when the plant is dormant and has stored up energy in the root. For medicinal use, most sources say Autumn harvest is best. Never fret because it is possible to buy them dried too from health food stores.

These bitters help to soothe gas, burping, bloating and indigestion. They also balance our cravings for sweetness and help transition us off the heavier comforting foods of winter.  

This transition from Winter to Spring can be tricky as when it is cold we tend to eat more fatty foods. Embracing this time of year with foods that helps us digest foods with ease will give us the energy to power on through the year with the clarity and focus we bring to this new season of awakening. 

It is a really simple process. Take a jar of your preferred size and fill it with your preferred combination of bitter and aromatic ingredients listed to the right.  Then top this jar with your raw unpasteurised apple cider vinegar.  Reading the ingredients alone give me a burst of excitement and refreshment.

Fill your jar with combinations to ingredients listed and top with apple cider vinegar, leaving to infuse for a minimum of 2 weeks.  I like to leave it as long as possible, six weeks on occasion.

BITTER BASE:

Citrus peels: lemon, lime, orange, grapefruit (organic necessary)

Bitter roots: dandelion root, liquorice root, turmeric root, ginger root.

AROMATICS:

Spices: allspice, aniseed (anise), caraway, cardamom, celery seed, chillies, cinnamon, cloves, coriander seeds, fennel, ground ginger, juniper berries, nutmeg, peppercorns, star anise, vanilla pods

Herbs and flowers: chamomile, hibiscus, hops, lavender, lemongrass, mint, rose, rosemary, sage, thyme

Beans: cacao beans, cocoa nibs, coffee beans


From the tomb to the womb

There are some things that once considered from a different perspective are irrevocable. This year rolled into existence unlike any other, where a new year, new resolutions are the normal tide.  But from the year that was to the unknown year to be, instinctively it felt so right to remain quiet.  No new year resolutions to make and break for me, no planning, visioning, firing up the engine to power into another year of carving out this less travelled path.I am remain in the pause, the place between. deep in the roots of winter, listening and learning from the quiet  to the whispers of my heart.  There has been much to learn, much to let go of and much to become at peace with before the gentle tug of seeds deep in my soul wanting to grow with all the possibilities.

I have been so blissfully buried amongst pages and pages of inspiring books and this one has flipped the mind.

Environmental arts therapy and the Tree of Life by Ian Siddons Heginworth.  In its own words it guides us through the Celtic calendar to explore the relationship between the feeling experience of the human heart and the turning year. Practical, poetic, innovative and magical, it eaches us how to take the personal issues that bind and oppress us out into Nature where they can be met, confronted and transformed.  It is has the perfect remedy for this place of Pause, January. The place between the tomb of December and the womb of February.

This book is for anyone who loves Nature.  This book is for anyone who longs for meaningful ritual and seeks to make it a living part of their lives. This book is for anyone who loves the magical language of metaphor and is beginning to understand its boundless power to manifest change, and this book is for anyone who loves fairy tales, myths and stories and wonders at their possible meanings.

This book has refined the beginning of the year for me.  Instead of getting caught up in the drama and disappointment of a New Year, unrealistic resolutions pitched at the wrong time,  I am convinced of the importance to stay inward, to deeply listen and to wait in the stillness for the seeds to waken with the light of spring.


Waste not, want not.

We love food here at The Cultured Club, so much so, we hate to see any of it go to waste.  We try our best of extract as much potential out of every morsel before it ends up in the compost.

Every Autumn we make a beautiful batch of Master Tonic to boost immune systems and ward off any lurgy. It is a potent and spicy infusion of five basic ingredients soaked in unpasteurised apple cider vinegar we get direct from Long Meadow Apple Farm in the Orchard County of Armagh.

At the end of this process I am always left with an abundance of the ingredients vegetable matter. It smells amazing and still holds great nutritional value.  It is a heady mix of onion, garlic, ginger, chilli and horseradish and I just can never bare to banish this flavour bomb to the compost.

Each year I invest a lot of time and energy into dehydrating these ingredients, resulting in a reasonable quantity of this dried powder seasoning which i have in the past used to sprinkle on rice or use in a marinade.  But this time round I have struck gold and I have hit on a condiment I just cannot get enough of, in fact two different condiments I guarantee will blow your mind….. or at least your taste buds!

There a divinely inspired and Iam sure you are going to LOVE them.

Amazing with everything RAYU

THIS creation is for many an occassion. Consisting of the dried master tonic ingredients mixed with some roasted nuts or seeds for extra crunch, it is sumberged a in sesame seed oil with a splash of tamari and a dollop of honey (only if you need some sweet in your life.)  It is spicy, salty, sour, umami, rich, deep and unbelievably satiating.  All that remains is for you to see of yourself.

Order your powder sample

Gochujang, Gochugoing.

A spicy paste used in Korean cooking, made from red chilli peppers, fermented soya beans, rice, and salt. It is similar to miso and is as versatile. I like to use it straight on toast, or stirred into dipping sauces but it is really for you to see what way it gets you going!  Stir it into soups or stews to bring this to the next level. This recipe has it all:

  • 1/3 cup white miso
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup master tonic powder
  • 1/4 cup tamari
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • water to thin if needed.

Pop everything into the blender and whizz it up.

order MAster Tonic powder

Food waste could easily get you down.  I love ferment as the net that catches food that is edging towards the bin.  It has inspired some fab creations for making vinegar from fruit scraps, to digestive bitters with citrus peels.  We freeze all our vegetable scraps to make nutrient rich soup stocks and always explore ways to use over ripe fruits to flavour fermented drinks.  In no way do we wish to preach but researching some tips we have found useful  have really had huge impact on our overall food waste.

  • Shop realistically
  • Don’t over serve
  • Save (and eat) your leftovers
  • Store food correctly
  • Avoid cluttering your fridge
  • Sell by dates are guidelines
  • Be mindful of what you throw out
  • Donate to food banks
  •  FERMENT vegetables
  • Last resort make sure to compost it

Tonic Time

I hear the whisper.
It’s the tilt in the sun.
A drop in temperature.
The dark that falls noticeable earlier.
Autumn is on its way and it is time to brew the MASTER TONIC.

 

This tonic could raise the dead.

 
The Master Tonic is a natural anti-viral, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-parasitic tonic to take through the autumn and winter months of cold and flu season.   As we know, 2020 has already been one hell of a year. Supporting your immune system has never been as important.  So what makes it so potent?

Garlic What doesn’t garlic do? Garlic is believed to be an anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-viral, and anti-fungal, qualities that make it a popular immune-booster.

Ginger famous for both culinary use and healing uses. Ginger is believed to help ward off cold, flu, and infections plus soothe sore throats.  It has been studied for anti-inflammatory properties and anti-nausea properties/

Chilli How much heat can you handle?.  Chillis help with digestion and metabolic rate.  They are a great support for the immune system and act as a natural decongestant. Red & Orange varieties have high levels of vitamins A & C but  any variety of these spicy fingers wake up the body. You can feel them right down to your toes.

Onions are believed to be a great expectorant. They possess a variety of anti-oxidants and are believed to have high levels of quercetin which has been shown to help reduce the risk of upper respiratory infections.

Horseradish If you’ve ever cut into fresh horseradish root, you know the purging effect it has on your sinuses and nasal cavity! Horseradish is incredible for stimulating the immune system. It has a warming effect once you have solidered through the preparation of this eye-watering root.

Order your tonic today.
Traditional Master Tonic.
 This infusion will be made from the 5 basic ingredients mentioned above.
Extra Spicy.
This infusion will have a greater abundance of chills and horseradish for those who like it hot
Extra Fruity
This infusion will feature Rosemary and Elderberry, offering a smoother tonic for those shy of the spice..
order a bottle.

 

FEEL IT,

FEEL WELL.

 

 

For daily immune support drink 25ml per day.

Feeling under the weather?  Take 3-5 times per day.

Suitable for use during pregnancy and safe for children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For daily immune support drink 25ml-30ml per day.
Feeling under the weather?  Take 3-5 times per day.
Suitable for use during pregnancy and safe for children 

Disclaimer: The information included in this post is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. None of the opinions expressed here are meant to diagnose or treat any disease or illness. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation or if you have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. 


The secret to SAUCY

Sauces are essential to cuisines. They can play many roles.  Even when some of our dishes only have a few elements on the plate, the sauce can actually be one of the focal points.  

At least that is how it is for me.  I have mastered the art of simple cooking which allows the sauces to steal the show, bringing a new flavour and accentuating the simplicity of the other ingredients.  Furthermore, the sauce is where i like to hide all those unique vibrant flavours  and sour notes which fermented foods offer, whilst delivering a healthy dose of probiotic goodness to the meal. Sweet, Sour, Salty all combine to give texture, balance and satisfaction to any meal.

Who loves a chilli sauce? Sweet, sour, salty, spicy smoothed out with a creamy finish.

My mother was a cookery teacher and when I was a little girl she shared her wisdom and skill in the kitchen with me…mostly passed on by osmosis.  One of the first things she taught me were THE MOTHER SAUCES which form the foundations of many other sauces and dishes. Mastering these sauces gave such scope.  The kitchen was a playground of flavour and possibility.  Still the joy of playing prevails even though I am older in years.  Making simple food elevate with a well balanced sauce has been an enjoyable pursuit of recent years.

With fermented foods a firm fixture in my culinary regime, the use of these fermented pantry staples allows for continual experiments.  I have experienced so deeply the nutritional and healing qualities of these foods and their transformational effects.  Not only will they rock your taste buds but they will elevate your health.

In the many years of working with fermented foods, I have witnessed a host of reactions. From those who cannot get enough, like me, it is an instant affair, to those who will give it a curious try but the romance never blooms. “An acquired taste” they may say.  But the most curious group of all  is the group were this notion, this sourness, is a travesty.

WELL , I have a secret.  I have been working on a recipe collection of SAUCES for a while BECAUSE they possess a unique flavour and harnessing unlocks some unforgettable tastes.

It was in tribute to my late mother that the inspiration of this book first flowed forth, wishing to honour the skill she instilled in me.  This endeavour has been met with wavering enthusiasm as the year that followed her death, Cancer would slowly, yet agressively, steal away my lovely sister-in-law and friend, too young and too soon.

It is always a balance of watering your own patch and wanting to help water someone elses.  To soothe, I would make some more kimchi satay, knowing this is what makes the world a better place, well dinner at least and life would ebb and flow with various degrees of inertia.  I would put some chimichurri on my pizza (yes, you must try it!) and preserve yet another jar of lemons or garlic.

And then the world went on pause, I felt an overwhelming sense of reevaluation.  Finally we all had TIME. Time to FERMENT thoughts AND supplies.  Time to play too.

Grief was not done with me yet and soon after lock down, my father passed away, to be honest, I temporarily lost a bit of me too.  A little winded by grief and lacking the zest one needs to share or even care, I shelved this project once again.

However, these foods saved me. They heal. They preserve and their effervescence cannot be contained.  I found a way to blend it all together to get back to my SAUCY LIFE.

Life (and dinner) would be very bland without the things that bring joy. So with a double serving of admiration and love, I finally have something I am delighted to share with you.

Six EASY fermented staples.

Twenty Six Special SAUCES

A Cultural adventure.

A Culinary Explosion

Make the TIME.

Make the choice.

Have some FUN.

Share the FUNK

SAUCY is a new ebook by author Dearbhla Reynolds making fermented foods an adventure in flavour, fun and good gut health.

join our course today

SOURDOUGH

There was a time when bread was off the menu.  It was an inventive time of crackers made with seeds and fauxdough made with flax meal and nuts.  All delicious of course BUT there is nothing that beats the deeply satisfying taste of flour, water, salt and time.  

My hubby became the baker, making friends with wild yeasts, falling in love with the science behind gluten and perfecting his folding techniques, all in search of the perfect crumb and that happy feeling of a fresh loaf from the oven first thing in the morning.

More than happy to leave him to his exclusive relationship with the dough I found it rather amusing that my first job in OX restaurant is to make the bread.  From baking none to ten a day to be served in a mitchelin star restaurant, the love affair has captivated me too and it is now our joint pursuit and pleasure to spread the love.  If not this at least something worthy of spreading some butter on ❤️

JOIN Us for a sourdough workshop

We are scheduling our dates for 2020 and hope that you can join us.

As it is the season to be jolly, bread has to be up there with one of the simplest and jolliest things going!  We are offering GIFT VOUCHERs for you to surprise your nearest and dearest with.  All gift vouchers can be posted out if ordered before December 20th.

 

It is the gift that will keep giving, at least a loaf or two. Stretch someones creative muscles and tune up their artistic side.

ORDER your Gift VOUCHER £25 (inc p+p)

Autumn, What does it mean to you?

The lines between our seasons, I will admit, are blurred here on the emerald isle swaying between warm wet to colder wet and some wind BUT least I rant, Autumn is a wonderful month.

It is the time to harvest all the brightly coloured cultivated or wild foods.

YES, for me, Autumn is time of both harvest and of preparation as we know what Winter brings.  It is a time to build up our immunity and breathe into the season, knowing that we will be strong enough to take whatever Winter brings.

As much as I love the carefree nature of summer, I think Autumn is my season.  As summer ends I feel the exhaustion of its giddy ways.  Autumn brings a warmth and a chance to slow down a little, to be content and give ourselves some extra attention.

It is Master Tonic time.

 

It is elderberry immune elixir time.

 

And it is time for grounding warming foods include all the root vegetables, the hard winter squashes like butternut and pumpkin. Everything with spices like ginger, garlic, onion, black pepper, coriander, cumin,  cardamon, cinnamon, Garam Masala, or middle eastern blends like Ras El Hanout or Bharat.

 

Enjoying an evening walk is a sweet way to take in the seasonal changes which are all but subtle at this time of year.  Make sure to bring a basket or bag to collect something delightful from the hedgerows and bushes.

 

Elderberry Elixir

Ingredients:

4 cups fresh elderberries (or 2 cups dried)

4 cups cold water (filtered)

2-3 tsp. dried or fresh ginger

1 cinnamon stick

1 cup raw, local honey (or organic maple syrup or agave for a vegan/infant-friendly recipe). Double the amount of sweetener to increase shelf life

1 cup vodka or brandy (optional to increase shelf life)

 

Instructions: 

  1. Combine berries and spices with cold water in a pot and bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat and allow to simmer 30 to 40 min. (syrup should reduce by ⅓)
  3. Remove from heat and let it soak for 1 hour.
  4. Mash mixture to get the most goodness out of the berries
  5. Strain using a funnel or a strainer and doubled cheesecloth or undyed cotton muslin bag and squeeze out liquid (careful, liquid can still be hot!). Discard the pulp in compost.
  1. Once liquid has cooled to just above room temperature, add honey and stir to incorporate.
  2. If using vodka or brandy, add here and stir until well combined.
  3. Bottle in sterilized glass jar.
  4. If you are feeling extra clever you can use this exilir and turn it into dummies by

 


The Magic of Medicinal Mushrooms

Fascinating Fungi

Mushrooms — which are fungi, not plants — have recently been shown to have a positive effect on cognitive function. Adding them to your diet may be one of the simplest ways to support your brain health.

In September of 2018 I was fortunate to meet Sir Roger Philips, one of Britain’s foremost experts on wild food. He has written many books, including the essential illustrated mycological encyclopedia.  Once met, never forgotten, there is no-one quite like Rodger Philips, He is as fascinating as the subject matter he writes about and to forget him would most certainly be a suggestion of cognitive decline.  Pictured is a small section of his guided forage walk around Haywarden Estate in Chester, after which he demonstarted many muchroom recipes over the open camp fire. The love of mushrooms was intensified and I patiently await for mushroom season to return.

mushrooms

Mushrooms are packed with numerous vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that provide outstanding health benefits.

 

“A number of edible mushrooms have been shown to contain rare and exotic compounds that exhibit positive effects on brain cells both in vitro and in vivo … In short, these mushrooms may be regarded as functional foods for the mitigation of neurodegenerative diseases,” researchers wrote in the Journal of Medicinal Food.

 

Should you share our fascination of fungi and the man health benefits they impart, consider joining us for a Special Event at our Cultured HQ on May 4th where we explore the magic of the medicinal mushroom.  We will be joined by holistic nutritional counsellor, Barbara Faibish, to guide us through her favourite medicinal mushrooms and her favourite ways to eat these gifts of nature. 

For more information CHECK HERE.


More than squeezing your lemons!

The saliva glands are watering because they are so good, not just because of their nutritional superpowers but because the fermentation process transforms the lemon peel’s bitterness into a unique taste that will amaze you.

Rich in probiotics
Alkalizing
A liver detoxifier (the peel contains d-limonene which helps liver detox)
An immune booster (through the high content of vitamin C)

What’s not to love? We have a great habit of squeezing our lemons and then throwing the best bit out.

Preserved lemons are traditioanl to North African and Middle Eastern cuisines.  Used as a highly flavorful condiment to brighten up pretty much any dish.

But have you skipped by them not quite sure what to do with them?

To use in cooking, just rinse the preserved lemon, remove the seeds and use the rind and/or pulp in your recipe. Chop up and add to salad dressings.

Of course that just scratches the surface, there are many a culinary trick from tapenade to tonic, with this exquisite umami flavour.

Preserved Lemons Saturday 13th April @TheCulturedClub

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The Cultured Club is dedicated to reviving this lost tradition and bringing the control of our health into our own kitchens.
'Let food be thy medicine and thy medicine be food' is a hard philosophy to live by when we are so removed from the food we eat.

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